ESXTOP not displaying properly?

I’ve seen quite a few posts lately about ESXTOP not displaying properly. Long story short, esxtop does not display the interactive UI and displays the CSV output instead.

If your esxtop looks like this, then you need to change the terminal declaration to something like xterm. Notice here (red rectangle), how the terminal is set to xterm-256color.

xterm-256color

 

You can change the terminal declaration from the cli, but this is not persistent through sessions.

To do this simply type “TERM=xterm“.

To display the current terminal declaration type “echo $TERM

termxterm

 

 

This will display esxtop interface properly.

esxtop

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you want this change to persist, just change your favorite terminal settings to xterm from its current setting. For example, I use my Mac’s terminal to ssh into my lab, the terminal is set to xterm-256color, which causes the display issue. So, I just opened the terminal preferences and changed the declaration to xterm. By default, putty identifies itself as xterm(1), so no need to change that. If putty is set to something else, then you can change the terminal-type string from the Connection>Data section.

term_declaration

 

My Move to VMware: The Road Ahead

vmwareI am happy to announce that I’m joining VMware as a Storage Solutions Architect. Although I am a little sad to leave my prior employer (High Availability Inc.), I am very excited for what the future holds.

 

I will be focusing on… yes, you guessed it, Virtual SAN. For those that know me, you know that this is “my thing”. I am one that makes educated decisions and calculated risks, and joining the VSAN team during these exciting times is a move I’m more than happy to make.

As a partner, I’ve seen the growing interest on VSAN as well as its adoption on businesses of all sizes. Having been part of large VSAN implementations in the past, I am looking forward to focusing on this technology, and expanding my knowledge base on all things VMware.

I would like to thank Steve at High Availability Inc. for being a super cool boss, and I wish them the best on their fast growth as a top notch VAR.

I’m looking forward to working with old acquaintances such as John Nicholson and Pete Flecha (Virtually Speaking Podcast guys), as well as the rest of the VSAN team.

 

road_ahead

VMworld ’16 TFDx: PrimaryData

pd_logoAt VMworld 2016 TechField Day extra, PrimaryData announced the launch of DataSphere allowing for simplified management and orchestration, as well as increased application uptime, and ability to scale out any storage vendor.

To be honest, I was not familiar with PrimaryData before TFDx; however, I can see say that there is a future for this technology.

What does PrimaryData bring to the table?

Well, to put it in simple terms, PrimaryData does to storage what VMware did to compute. Yes, PrimaryData virtualizes the data and is able to decouple the data from silo storage arrays, allowing admins to move data between different storage vendors with little to no downtime. PrimaryData is a software solution, so it can be deployed as an OVA or on physical hardware.

This is very powerful, in my humble opinion. I have spent the last year and a half moving customers from NetApp 7-mode to clustered mode. If the customers run VMware, then moves are as easy as a storage vMotion, but other workloads for NAS and SAN can be tricky, mainly because customers are not allowed to have downtime. Although NetApp has a tool called 7MTT, it is ok for basic moves, but not very user friendly to the point where customers require PS in order to be able to use.

I would love to see PrimaryData involved for NetApp migrations. I think this will make the adoption to clustered mode more enticing, faster, and easier.

Aside from migrations, you can look at this solution as a way to tier your data among different vendors and types of media. You can do automatic tiering based on objectives, and the software is smart enough to move your data for compliance of such objectives, whether it is on different storage vendors or the cloud.

PrimaryData works with VMware’s VSAN AND VVols, how cool is that?!?!?

Definitely check them out. This is a technology everyone should keep their eye on…

primary_data

 

Check out their TFDx presentation here

 

VMworld ’16 TFDx: Ops view of Docker

docker_logo

I was fortunate to participate at VMworld’s 2016 Tech Field Day (extra (TFDx)). One of the presenters was Mike Coleman from Docker.

This presentation was, in my opinion, properly steered towards the correct crowd to get docker in the operations side of the house. Docker has been around for a while now, but the adoption seems to be solely focused on the developer side, which is fine, but the operations side needs to buy into it, if Docker wants to bleed into Enterprise and SMB environments.

Once you deploy an app, the developers build task is completed and now becomes an operational task, aside from updates and such.

This is a great presentation for those that keep hearing about Docker, but have not had the time to read up on it. Starting from a 101 of what Docker is, how it is deployed, and tools to manage.

Few highlights:

  • Containers are not VMs
  • Containers share Kernel
  • VMs are houses (own plumbing, own electric, etc)
  • Containers are Apartments (shared resources like plumbing)
  • Docker engine runs on top of OS
  • It can be run on Physical or Virtual

 

tfdx_docker

 

tfdx-docker2

 

Again, whether you are a Docker newbie or just curious, you should definitely check out this presentation about Docker.

You can find the Docker videos at the Tech Field Day Website

 

FlexGroups: An evolution of NAS

Another excellent write up by JP…

Why Is The Internet Broken?

evolution-of-man-parodies-333

Check out the official NetApp version of this blog on the NetApp Newsroom!

I’ve been the NFS TME at NetApp for 3 years now.

I also cover name services (LDAP, NIS, DNS, etc.) and occasionally answer the stray CIFS/SMB question. I look at NAS as a data utility, not unlike water or electricity in your home. You need it, you love it, but you don’t really think about it too much and it doesn’t really excite you.

However, once I heard that NetApp was creating a brand new distributed file system that could evolve how NAS works, I jumped at the opportunity to be a TME for it. So, now, I am the Technical Marketing Engineer for NFS, Name Services and NetApp FlexGroup (and sometimes CIFS/SMB). How’s that for a job title?

We covered NetApp FlexGroup in the NetApp Tech ONTAP Podcast the week of June 30, but I…

View original post 1,853 more words